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About Neodymium Magnets

How is the surface field measured?

Gauss meters are used to calculate the magnetic field density at the surface of a magnet.  Each magnet has the surface field measurement listed in the specifications chart.

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How are neodymium magnets made?

Our neodymium magnets, also known as NIB or NdFeB magnets, are comprised of a neodymium, iron, and boron compound referred to as Nd2Fe14B. This compound is a powdered mixture. It is first poured, then pressed (using extreme pressure) into specially-cast molds. The compound is then sintered (heated under a vacuum), cooled, then ground or sliced into the desired shape.Next, the magnets are dipped in a specified coating material such as zinc, gold, or the triple-layer nickel/copper/nickel alloy plating. Finally, the magnets are magnetized by exposing them to an extremely strong magnetic field. This final step is what turns neodymium magnets...

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Are neodymium magnets the same as "rare earth" magnets?

Yes. Neodymium magnets are part of the rare earth magnet genre because neodymium is a rare earth element (symbol Nd) on the Periodic Table.

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What does pull force mean?

Every neodymium magnet has a pull force, which tells you exactly how strong that magnet is. Measured in pounds or kilograms, the pull force is the force required to pull that magnet straight free from a 1/8 inch (3.175 mm) thick steel plate. The pull force also tells you the limit on the holding power of the magnet.Generally, any magnet with a pull force above seven pounds (3.175 kg) can pinch your fingers. Stronger magnets can be even more dangerous and should only be handled by experienced individuals.Magnet placement can dramatically affect pull force.While the pull force rating enables you...

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Are neodymium magnets waterproof?

No. While magnets are typically coated with nickel, zinc or epoxy to protect them against rust and corrosion from moisture they are not waterproof. Neodymium magnets will work wet or submerged for a short period. Any water penetration into the magnet, however, will cause a slow deterioration of the magnet’s magnetic field and cause rust to leak from even the most microscopic scratch or aberration in the magnet’s outer coating. If you are looking for waterproof neodymium magnets, check out our Sewing Magnets. These magnets are encased in a waterproof PVC pouch that protects them from moisture.

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Will neodymium magnets lose their strength over time?

Very little. If they are properly handled, which includes not overheated or physically damaged, our neodymium magnets will lose less than 1 percent of their strength over 10 years. This is not enough to notice without very sensitive measuring equipment. In addition, the neodymium magnets we offer will not lose their strength even if they are held in repelling or attracting positions with other magnets over long periods of time.

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Can I drill or machine neodymium magnets?

Generally speaking, no. All neodymium magnets, while solid and hard, are also very brittle. The hardness of the neodymium nickel coating material is rated at RC46 on the Rockwell "C" scale, and this is harder than commercially available drills and tooling. As a result, these tools will heat up and become damaged if used on neodymium magnets. Machining of neodymium magnets can be done, but should only be performed by experienced machinists familiar with the risk and safety issues involved. Normally, diamond tooling, EDM (Electrostatic Discharge Machines), and abrasives are the preferred methods for shaping neodymium magnet material. It is...

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Can moisture and temperature affect neodymium magnets?

Yes. Although they have the highest magnetic field strength and have a higher coercivity (which makes them magnetically stable), neodymium magnets have a lower Curie temperature and are more sensitive to heat and vulnerable to oxidation than samarium-cobalt magnets. While neodymium magnets have been proven to retain their effectiveness up to 80°C or 176°F, this temperature may vary depending on the grade, shape and application of the particular magnet. If a magnet is heated above its maximum operating temperature (176°F/80°C for standard N grades) the magnet will permanently lose a fraction of its magnetic strength.  If they are heated above...

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Why should I be so careful with neodymium magnets?

They are surprisingly strong, much more powerful than most other magnets you may have handled. When you are separating and working with them, they will jump back together unexpectedly. In fact, the greater force exerted by rare earth magnets creates hazards that are not seen with other types of ceramic or alnico magnets. Neodymium magnets that are larger than a few centimeters are strong enough to cause injuries including pinched and/or lacerated fingers. Strong magnets can even cause broken bones.Magnets that are allowed to get too near to each other can suddenly jump together and strike each other with enough...

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What are the most common applications of neodymium magnets?

The most common places you’ll find neodymium magnets include: Retail signs and counter displays. Trade show booths and staging structures. Leather purses, bags, garments and holsters. Custom boxes for premium products. Presentation folders and scrapbooks. Arts, crafts and jewelry. Wood doors and cabinets as door latches. Health bracelets, bandages and other medical devices. Window coverings and blinds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices. Audio speakers. Vacuum cleaners and other motorized household appliances. Bicycle dynamos. Computer hard drives. Wind turbine generators. Fishing reel brakes. Permanent magnet motors in cordless tools. High-performance AC servo motors. Traction motors. Integrated starter-generators in hybrid and electric...

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